9 Powerful Health Benefits of Cumin

Written by Matthew Thorpe, MD, PhD | www.healthline.com

Cumin is a spice made from the seeds of the Cuminum cyminum plant.

Many dishes use cumin, especially foods from its native regions of the Mediterranean and Southwest Asia.

Cumin lends its distinctive flavor to chili, tamales and various Indian curries. Its flavor has been described as earthy, nutty, spicy and warm.

What’s more, cumin has long been used in traditional medicine.

Modern studies have confirmed some of the health benefits cumin is traditionally known for, including promoting digestion and reducing food-borne infections.

Research has also revealed some new benefits, such as promoting weight loss and improving blood sugar control and cholesterol.

This article will review nine evidence-based health benefits of cumin.

1. Promotes Digestion

The most common traditional use of cumin is for indigestion.

In fact, modern research has confirmed cumin may help rev up normal digestion.

For example, it may increase the activity of digestive enzymes, potentially speeding up digestion.

Cumin also increases the release of bile from the liver. Bile helps digest fats and certain nutrients in your gut.

In one study, 57 patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) reported improved symptoms after taking concentrated cumin for two weeks.

SUMMARY:Cumin aids digestion by increasing the activity of digestive proteins. It may also reduce symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome.

 

2. Is a Rich Source of Iron

Cumin seeds are naturally rich in iron.

One teaspoon of ground cumin contains 1.4 mg of iron, or 17.5% of the RDI for adults.

Iron deficiency is one of the most common nutrient deficiencies, affecting up to 20% of the world’s population and up to 10 in 1,000 people in the wealthiest nations.

In particular, children need iron to support growth and young women need iron to replace blood lost during menstruation.

Few foods are as iron-dense as cumin. This makes it a good iron source, even when used in small amounts as a seasoning.

SUMMARY:Many people around the world don’t get enough iron. Cumin is very dense in iron, providing almost 20% of your daily iron in one teaspoon.

3. Contains Beneficial Plant Compounds

Cumin contains lots of plant compounds that are linked with potential health benefits, including terpenes, phenols, flavonoids and alkaloids.

Several of these function as antioxidants, which are chemicals that reduce damage to your body from free radicals.

Free radicals are basically lonely electrons. Electrons like being in pairs and when they split up, they become unstable.

These lone, or “free” electrons steal other electron partners away from other chemicals in your body. This process is called “oxidation.”

The oxidation of fatty acids in your arteries leads to clogged arteries and heart disease. Oxidation also leads to inflammation in diabetes, and the oxidation of DNA can contribute to cancer.

Antioxidants like those in cumin give an electron to a lonely free radical electron, making it more stable.

Cumin’s antioxidants likely explain some of its health benefits.

SUMMARY:Free radicals are lone electrons that cause inflammation and damage DNA. Cumin contains antioxidants that stabilize free radicals.

4. May Help With Diabetes

Some of cumin’s components have shown promise helping to treat diabetes.

One clinical study showed a concentrated cumin supplement improved early indicators of diabetes in overweight individuals, compared to a placebo.

Cumin also contains components that counter some of the long-term effects of diabetes.

One of the ways diabetes harms cells in the body is through advanced glycation end products (AGEs).

They’re produced spontaneously in the bloodstream when blood sugar levels are high over long periods of time, as they are in diabetes. AGEs are created when sugars attach to proteins and disrupt their normal function.

AGEs are likely responsible for damage to eyes, kidneys, nerves and small blood vessels in diabetes.

Cumin contains several components that reduce AGEs, at least in test-tube studies.

While these studies tested the effects of concentrated cumin supplements, routinely using cumin as a seasoning may help control blood sugar in diabetes.

It is not yet clear what is responsible for these effects, or how much cumin is needed to cause benefits.

SUMMARY:Cumin supplements may help improve blood sugar control, though it is not clear what causes this effect or how much is needed.

5. May Improve Blood Cholesterol

Cumin has also improved blood cholesterol in clinical studies.

In one study, 75 mg of cumin taken twice daily for eight weeks decreased unhealthy blood triglycerides.

In another study, levels of oxidized “bad” LDL cholesterol were decreased by nearly 10% in patients taking cumin extract over one and a half months.

One study of 88 women looked at whether cumin affected levels of “good” HDL cholesterol. Those who took 3 grams of cumin with yogurt twice a day for three months had higher levels of HDL than those who ate yogurt without it.

It is not known if cumin used as seasoning in the diet has the same blood cholesterol benefits as the supplements used in these studies.

Also, not all studies agree on this effect. One study found no changes in blood cholesterol in participants who took a cumin supplement.

SUMMARY:Cumin supplements have improved blood cholesterol in multiple studies. It is unclear if using cumin in small amounts as a seasoning has the same benefits.

6. May Promote Weight Loss and Fat Reduction

Concentrated cumin supplements have helped promote weight loss in a few clinical studies.

One study of 88 overweight women found that yogurt containing 3 grams of cumin promoted weight loss, compared to yogurt without it.

Another study showed that participants who took 75 mg of cumin supplements every day lost 3 pounds (1.4 kg) more than those who took a placebo.

A third clinical study looked at the effects of a concentrated cumin supplement in 78 adult men and women. Those who took the supplement lost 2.2 pounds (1 kg) more over eight weeks than those who did not.

Again, not all studies agree. One study that used a smaller dose of 25 mg per day did not see any change in body weight, compared to a placebo.

SUMMARY:Concentrated cumin supplements have promoted weight loss in multiple studies. Not all studies have shown this benefit and higher doses may be required for weight loss.

 

7. May Prevent Food-Borne Illnesses

One of cumin’s traditional roles in seasoning may have been for food safety.

Many seasonings, including cumin, appear to have antimicrobial properties that may reduce the risk of food-borne infections.

Several components of cumin reduce the growth of food-borne bacteria and certain kinds of infectious fungi.

When digested, cumin releases a component called megalomicin, which has antibiotic properties.

Additionally, a test-tube study showed that cumin reduces the drug resistance of certain bacteria.

SUMMARY:Cumin’s traditional use as a seasoning may restrict the growth of infectious bacteria and fungi. This may reduce food-borne illnesses.

8. May Help With Drug Dependence

Narcotic dependence is a growing concern internationally.

Opioid narcotics create addiction by hijacking the normal sense of craving and reward in the brain. This leads to continued or increased use.

Studies in mice have shown that cumin components reduce addictive behavior and withdrawal symptoms.

However, much more research is needed to determine whether this effect would be useful in humans.

The next steps include finding the specific ingredient that caused this effect and testing whether it works in humans.

SUMMARY:Cumin extracts reduce signs of narcotic addiction in mice. It is not yet known if they would have similar effects in humans.

9. May Fight Inflammation

Test-tube studies have shown cumin extracts inhibit inflammation.

There are several components of cumin that may have anti-inflammatory effects, but researchers don’t yet know which are most important.

Plant compounds in several spices have been shown to reduce levels of a key inflammation marker, NF-kappaB.

There is not enough information right now to know whether cumin in the diet or cumin supplements are useful in treating inflammatory diseases.

SUMMARY:Cumin contains multiple plant compounds that decrease inflammation in test-tube studies. It is not clear if it can be used to help treat inflammatory diseases in people.

Should You Use Cumin?

You can get some of cumin’s benefits just by using small amounts to season food.

These quantities will provide antioxidants, iron and potential benefits for controlling blood sugar.

Other, more experimental benefits — such as weight loss and improved blood cholesterol — may require a higher dose, probably in supplement form.

Multiple studies have tested cumin supplements of up to 1 gram (about 1 teaspoon) without their participants reporting problems. However, severe allergic reactions to cumin have been reported, but are very rare.

That said, be cautious when taking any supplement that contains much more cumin than you could possibly consume in food.

Just as with any ingredient, your body may not be equipped to process doses it would not normally experience in the diet.

If you decide to try supplements, let your doctor know what you’re taking and use the supplements to complement, not replace, medical treatments.

SUMMARY:You can get many of cumin’s benefits just by using small amounts as seasoning. Other benefits may only be available at supplemental doses

The Bottom Line

Cumin has many evidence-based health benefits. Some of these have been known since ancient times, while others are only just being discovered.

Using cumin as a spice increases antioxidant intake, promotes digestion, provides iron, may improve blood sugar control and may reduce food-borne illnesses.

Taking higher doses in supplement form has been linked to weight loss and improved blood cholesterol, though more research is needed.

I personally prefer to use cumin in cooking rather than as a supplement. This way, I take advantage of the 10th benefit of cumin — it’s delicious.

To read the original article, please click here.

Recipes

All about GARLIC

Happy National Garlic Day!

Seeing as today is National Garlic Day and we wanted to take a moment and tell you all about it!

Here is a great read on Medical News Today‘s website, writen by Christian Nordqvist and reviewed by Natalie Butler, RD, LD .  Christian talks about the benefits of garlic for both cooking and your health.

Garlic (Allium sativum), is used widely as a flavoring in cooking, but it has also been used as a medicine throughout ancient and modern history; it has been taken to prevent and treat a wide range of conditions and diseases.

Garlic belongs to the genus Allium and is closely related to the onion, rakkyo (an onion found in Asia), scallion, chive, leek, and shallot. It has been used by humans for thousands of years and was used in Ancient Egypt for both culinary purposes and its health and therapeutic benefits.

This article will look at the potential health benefits of garlic and cover any research that supports the claims.Fast facts on garlic

  • In many countries, garlic has been used medicinally for centuries.
  • Garlic may have a range of health benefits, both raw and cooked.
  • It may have significant antibiotic properties.

History

Bulbs and bowl of garlic

There are many medicinal claims about garlic.

Garlic has been used all over the world for thousands of years. Records indicate that garlic was in use when the Giza pyramids were built, about 5,000 years ago.

Richard S. Rivlin wrote in the Journal of Nutrition that the ancient Greek physician Hippocrates (circa. 460-370 BC), known today as “the father of Western medicine,” prescribed garlic for a wide range of conditions and illnesses. Hippocrates promoted the use of garlic for treating respiratory problems, parasites, poor digestion, and fatigue.

The original Olympic athletes in Ancient Greece were given garlic – possibly the earliest example of “performance enhancing” agents used in sports.

From Ancient Egypt, garlic spread to the advanced ancient civilizations of the Indus Valley (Pakistan and western India today). From there, it made its way to China.

According to experts at Kew Gardens, England’s royal botanical center of excellence, the people of ancient India valued the therapeutic properties of garlic and also thought it to be an aphrodisiac. The upper classes avoided garlic because they despised its strong odor, while monks, “…widows, adolescents, and those who had taken up a vow or were fasting, could not eat garlic because of its stimulant quality.”

Throughout history in the Middle East, East Asia, and Nepal, garlic has been used to treat bronchitis, hypertension (high blood pressure), TB (tuberculosis), liver disorders, dysenteryflatulencecolic, intestinal worms, rheumatism, diabetes, and fevers.

The French, Spanish, and Portuguese introduced garlic to the New World.

Uses

Currently, garlic is widely used for several conditions linked to the blood system and heart, including atherosclerosis (hardening of the arteries), high cholesterol, heart attack, coronary heart disease, and hypertension.

Garlic is also used today by some people for the prevention of lung cancer, prostate cancer, breast cancer, stomach cancer, rectal cancer, and colon cancer.

It is important to add that only some of these uses are backed by research.

A study published in the journal Food and Chemical Toxicology warned that short-term heating reduces the anti-inflammatory effects of fresh raw garlic extracts. This may be a problem for some people who do not like or cannot tolerate the taste and/or odor of fresh garlic.

Benefits

Below are examples of some scientific studies published in peer-reviewed academic journals about the therapeutic benefits (or not) of garlic.

Lung cancer risk

People who ate raw garlic at least twice a week during the 7 year study period had a 44 percent lower risk of developing lung cancer, according to a study conducted at the Jiangsu Provincial Center for Disease Control and Prevention in China.

The researchers, who published their study in the journal Cancer Prevention Research, carried out face-to-face interviews with 1,424 lung cancer patients and 4,543 healthy individuals. They were asked about their diet and lifestyle, including questions on smoking and how often they ate garlic.

The study authors wrote: “Protective association between intake of raw garlic and lung cancer has been observed with a dose-response pattern, suggesting that garlic may potentially serve as a chemo-preventive agent for lung cancer.”

Brain cancer

Organo-sulfur compounds found in garlic have been identified as effective in destroying the cells in glioblastomas, a type of deadly brain tumor.

Scientists at the Medical University of South Carolina reported in the journal Cancer that three pure organo-sulfur compounds from garlic – DAS, DADS, and DATS – “demonstrated efficacy in eradicating brain cancer cells, but DATS proved to be the most effective.”

Co-author, Ray Swapan, Ph.D., said “This research highlights the great promise of plant-originated compounds as natural medicine for controlling the malignant growth of human brain tumor cells. More studies are needed in animal models of brain tumors before application of this therapeutic strategy to brain tumor patients.”

Hip osteoarthritis

Women whose diets were rich in allium vegetables had lower levels of osteoarthritis, a team at King’s College London and the University of East Anglia, both in England, reported in the journal BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders. Examples of allium vegetables include garlic, leeks, shallots, onions, and rakkyo.

The study authors said their findings not only highlighted the possible impact of diet on osteoarthritis outcomes but also demonstrated the potential for using compounds that exist in garlic to develop treatments for the condition.

The long-term study, involving more than 1,000 healthy female twins, found that those whose dietary habits included plenty of fruit and vegetables, “particularly alliums such as garlic,” had fewer signs of early osteoarthritis in the hip joint.

Potentially a powerful antibiotic

Diallyl sulfide, a compound in garlic, was 100 times more effective than two popular antibiotics in fighting the Campylobacter bacterium, according to a study published in the Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy.

The Campylobacter bacterium is one of the most common causes of intestinal infections.

Senior author, Dr. Xiaonan Lu, from Washington State University, said, “This work is very exciting to me because it shows that this compound has the potential to reduce disease-causing bacteria in the environment and in our food supply.”

Heart protection

Garlic in heart-shaped bowl

Garlic may contain heart-protective chemicals.

Diallyl trisulfide, a component of garlic oil, helps protect the heart during cardiac surgery and after a heart attack, researchers at Emory University School of Medicine found. They also believe diallyl trisulfide could be used as a treatment for heart failure.

Hydrogen sulfide gas has been shown to protect the heart from damage.

However, it is a volatile compound and difficult to deliver as therapy.

Because of this, the scientists decided to focus on diallyl trisulfide, a garlic oil component, as a safer way to deliver the benefits of hydrogen sulfide to the heart.

In experiments using laboratory mice, the team found that, after a heart attack, the mice that had received diallyl sulfide had 61 percent less heart damage in the area at risk, compared with the untreated mice.

In another study, published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, scientists found that garlic oil may help protect diabetes patients from cardiomyopathy.

Cardiomyopathy is the leading cause of death among diabetes patients. It is a chronic disease of the myocardium (heart muscle), which is abnormally thickened, enlarged, and/or stiffened.

The team fed diabetic laboratory rats either garlic oil or corn oil. Those fed garlic oil experienced significantly more changes associated with protection against heart damage, compared with the animals that were fed corn oil.

The study authors wrote, “In conclusion, garlic oil possesses significant potential for protecting hearts from diabetes-induced cardiomyopathy.”

Human studies will need to be performed to confirm the results of this study.

High cholesterol and high blood pressure

Researchers at Ankara University investigated the effects of garlic extract supplementation on the blood lipid (fat) profile of patients with high blood cholesterol. Their study was published in the Journal of Nutritional Biochemistry.

The study involved 23 volunteers, all with high cholesterol; 13 of them also had high blood pressure. They were divided into two groups:

  • The high-cholesterol normotensive group (normal blood pressure).
  • The high-cholesterol hypertensive group (high blood pressure).

They took garlic extract supplements for 4 months and were regularly checked for blood lipid parameters, as well as kidney and liver function.

At the end of the 4 months, the researchers concluded “…garlic extract supplementation improves blood lipid profile, strengthens blood antioxidant potential, and causes significant reductions in systolic and diastolic blood pressures. It also leads to a decrease in the level of oxidation product (MDA) in the blood samples, which demonstrates reduced oxidation reactions in the body.”

In other words, the garlic extract supplements reduced high cholesterol levels, and also blood pressure in the patients with hypertension. The scientists added that theirs was a small study – more work needs to be carried out.

Prostate cancer

Doctors at the Department of Urology, China-Japan Friendship Hospital, Beijing, China, carried out a study evaluating the relationship between Allium vegetable consumption and prostate cancer risk.

They gathered and analyzed published studies up to May 2013 and reported their findings in the Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention.

The study authors concluded, “Allium vegetables, especially garlic intake, are related to a decreased risk of prostate cancer.”

The team also commented that because there are not many relevant studies, further well-designed prospective studies should be carried out to confirm their findings.

Alcohol-induced liver injury

Alcohol-induced liver injury is caused by the long-term over-consumption of alcoholic beverages.

Scientists at the Institute of Toxicology, School of Public Health, Shandong University, China, wanted to determine whether diallyl disulfide (DADS), a garlic-derived organosulfur compound, might have protective effects against ethanol-induced oxidative stress.

Their study was published in Biochimica et Biophysica Acta.

The researchers concluded that DADS might help protect against ethanol-induced liver injury.

Preterm (premature) delivery

Microbial infections during pregnancy raise a woman’s risk of preterm delivery. Scientists at the Division of Epidemiology, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, studied what impact foods might have on antimicrobial infections and preterm delivery risk.

The study and its findings were published in the Journal of Nutrition.

Ronny Myhre and colleagues concentrated on the effects of Alliums and dried fruits, because a literature search had identified these two foods as showing the greatest promise for reducing preterm delivery risk.

The team investigated the intake of dried fruit and Alliums among 18,888 women in the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort, of whom 5 percent (950) underwent spontaneous PTD (preterm delivery).

The study authors concluded, “Intake of food with antimicrobial and prebiotic compounds may be of importance to reduce the risk of spontaneous PTD. In particular, garlic was associated with overall lower risk of spontaneous PTD.”

Garlic and the common cold

A team of researchers from St. Joseph Family Medicine Residency, Indiana, carried out a study titled “Treatment of the Common Cold in Children and Adults,” published in American Family Physician.

They reported that “Prophylactic use of garlic may decrease the frequency of colds in adults, but has no effect on duration of symptoms.” Prophylactic use means using it regularly to prevent disease.

Though there is some research to suggest that raw garlic has the most benefits, other studies have looked at overall allium intake, both raw and cooked, and have found benefits. Therefore, you can enjoy garlic in a variety of ways to reap its advantages.

ORDER ONLINE TODAY

Do spices ever really expire?

In many kitchens, spices are an abundance, but if you took a look at your pantry or spice rack right now, how old are your spices?

According to a report by Taste of Home,​ ground spices lose flavour quicker than whole spices​. The site added whole spices can last four years, ground spice three years, dried herbs three years, spice blends two years and fresh spices (not surprisingly) one week.

To read more on this article, follow the link below.
http://bit.ly/2uQXdPp

@tasteofhome @anarallidina @globalnews

And if your #spicerack needs a refresh, you know where to find us!
splendorgarden.com

What are the benefits of oregano?

Medical News Today | Joseph Nordqvist & Natalie Butler. RD.LD

Medical News Today published an interesting article on the benefits of oregano. It was written by Joseph Nordqvist and reviewed by Natalie Butler.

Joseph mentioned that this herb was used as herbal medicine as far back as the ancient greeks. They used it for everything from an antiseptic to gastrointestinal disorders.

The name of the herb comes from the Greek words “oros,” meaning mountain, and “ganos,” meaning joy. Oregano typically grows around 50 cm tall and has purple leaves around 2 to 3 centimeters in length.

Fast facts on oregano:

Here are some key points about oregano. More detail is in the main article.

  • Oregano is a Mediterranean herb that is used for cooking and medicinal purposes, ranging from treating infections to repelling insects.
  • Active ingredients in oregano could one day help treat osteoporosiscancer, and diabetes.
  • Use it to flavor sauces, make herby bread rolls, and in marinades for meat.
  • People with an allergy to mint should take care when consuming oregano.

Benefits

Oregano is available fresh, or dried for cooking, and oregano oil can be used to treat infections.

Oregano is available fresh, or dried for cooking, and oregano oil can be used to treat infections.

  • Oregano was used in herbal medicine as long ago as the Ancient Greeks.
  • Hippocrates used it as an antiseptic.
  • Possible medicinal uses of oregano include treating respiratory tract disorders, gastrointestinal (GI) disorders, menstrual cramps, and urinary tract disorders.
  • Applied topically, it may help treat a number of skin conditions, such as acne and dandruff.

He goes on to mention more about the health benefits of oregano.

1) Antibacterial properties

Oregano oil contains an essential compound called carvacrol, which has antimicrobial properties.

The herb has shown antimicrobial activity in a number of studies. One group of researchers found that Origanum vulgare essential oils were effective against 41 strains of the food pathogen Listeria monocytogenes.

Another team from India and the United Kingdom (U.K.) reported that the essential oil of Himalayan oregano has strong antibacterial properties that may protect against the hospital superbug, MRSA.

“We have done a few preliminary tests and have found that the essential oil from the oregano kills MRSA at a dilution 1 to 1,000. The tests show that the oil kills MRSA both as a liquid and as a vapor and its antimicrobial activity is not diminished by heating in boiling water.”

Prof. Vyv Salisbury, the University of the West of England, Bristol

The project won an award from the United Nations in 2008.

2) Anti-inflammatory properties

Scientists from Germany and Switzerland identified an active ingredient in oregano, known as beta-caryophyllin (E-BCP), which may help treat disorders such as osteoporosis and arteriosclerosis. E-BCP is a dietary cannabinoid.

3) Protecting against cancer

Research published in the journal PLoS ONE in 2013 suggested that oregano exhibits anticancer activity. The scientists concluded that Origanum majorana could help prevent and treat breast cancer by slowing or preventing its progression.

In 2014, food scientists discovered that the popular culinary herbs oregano, rosemary, and marjoram contain compounds that may have the potential to manage type 2 diabetes in a similar way to some currently prescribed drugs.

Other possible health benefits

According to The Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database, oregano can be used for the following illnesses and conditions:

Oregano essential oil, made from Origanum vulgare or Thymus capitatus, may help with the following problems:

  • Foot or nail fungus: Put a few drops in water and soak the feet in it, or apply diluted oil topically to the affected area.
  • Sinus infections and colds: Use a few drops in a steam bath and inhale.

Any essential oil should be diluted before use, either with a carrier oil, such as olive oil, or in water, as for a steam bath.

More research is needed to confirm oregano’s effectiveness as a treatment.

Risks

Eating oregano can cause stomach upsets in some people.

In addition, those who are allergic to plants belonging to the Lamiaceae family, which include oregano, basil, lavender, mint, and sage, should be cautious, as they may also develop an allergic reaction to oregano.

Nutrition

Oregano contains some important nutrients.

One teaspoon of dried oregano contains:

  • energy: 5 calories
  • fiber: 0.8 grams (g)
  • calcium: 29 milligrams (mg)
  • iron: 0.66 mg
  • magnesium: 5 g
  • manganese: 0.09 mg
  • potassium: 23 mg
  • vitamin E: 0.33 mg
  • vitamin K: 11.2 micrograms (mcg)

Vitamin K is important for bone growth, maintaining bone density, and the production of blood clotting proteins. Calcium is necessary for the formation of bones and teeth.

Oregano is also a rich source of dietary antioxidants, which help protect cells against the effects of free radicals and improve the body’s ability to fight infection.

Cooking tips

Oregano is a Mediterranean herb that goes well with pizzas and pasta sauces.

Other ideas include:

  • sprinkling meat or chicken with oregano for flavor
  • using it in marinades or stuffings
  • chopping and mixing it in bread dough to make herby rolls
  • adding it fresh to salad

Here are some more tips:

  • Add it toward the end of the cooking process for maximum flavor
  • The smaller you chop or grind it, the more flavor will be released
  • Start with a small amount, as too much can make the food bitter
  • One teaspoon of dried oregano is equivalent to one tablespoon of fresh oregano

It is available dried or fresh in grocery stores, or you can grow it in a pot on a windowsill or balcony or in the garden. It is a perennial, which means it can grow all year.

Various different forms of oregano are available to purchase online, including dried oregano and oregano seeds to grow the herb with.

Order online today!

For more information on this article and other medical articles, please go to
https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/266259.php .

Recipes

Recent Posts

Product of the Week – Mexican Blend – Salt Free

Our salt free Mexican Blend is a perfect combination of flavor without the
sodium. Use it in any of your favorite Mexican soups, sauces, marinades, brines, or roasts. (For example, instead of adding a combination of spices according to a recipe, simply add the Mexican Blend and your dish is set!) Add a tablespoon to 2 cups of rice or sprinkle over any steamed vegetable for a flavor from south-of-the-border.

Organic Mexican Blend – Salt Free

Check out the recommended recipes below, using the Splendor Garden Mexican Blend.

Smoked Paprika BBQ Sauce

Here is a super tasty recipe for a Smoked Paprika BBQ Sauce. This sauce is great to use on your chicken, ribs, pork chops and even burgers.

INGREDIENTS

INSTRUCTIONS:

In saucepan, heat oil over medium heat. Cook the onion until softened, stir often for about 5 minutes. Add the garlic and cook until fragrant, stir often for about 1 minute. Add the smoked paprika, stir in and cook for 30 seconds.

Stir in strained tomatoes, brown sugar, vinegar, Worcestershire sauce, mustard, pepper, salt, chili powder and 1/2 cup water. Bring it to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer, stirring occasionally, until slightly thickened, 15 to 18 minutes. Refrigerate in airtight container for up to 2 weeks.

Makes about 1 1/2 cups.

Find more #deliciouslyspicier recipes here.

Join our mailing list by clicking the SUBSCRIBE button.

15 Things That Happen to Your Body When You Cut Back on Salt

Reader’s Digest

Sodium is an important element that helps regulate fluid levels in the body. And while it is possible to not get enough salt in your diet, the vast majority of people actually consume way more than they need.

15 Things That Happen to Your Body When You Cut Back on Salt

Reader’s Digest posted an article on the affects that salt has on your body and health. With reducing your salt intake, there is so many positive outcomes. For instance, by lowering you salt intake, you can reduce the risk of heart attack and stroke, it may lower your blood pressure, less water retention, and weight loss, just to name a few.

Click here to learn more about what happens to your body when you cut back on salt.

https://goo.gl/Yug5zA

@readersdigest

Dill-icious Cream Cheese Dip

Entertaining this weekend? Try making a dill cream cheese dip using our Dill-icious Dip Mix.

This recipe is such an easy one to make and the list of ingredients are simple to find. You can even tweak it with other ingredients you may love. For example, shredded spinach to make a yummy dill spinach dip!

Simply soften 1 block of cream cheese. Add 1/2 cup of mayonnaise and 1/2 cup of plain greek yogurt or sour cream works too, and blend until smooth.
Hand stir in 1/4 cup of crumbled feta. Add a dash salt and pepper to taste.
Finally, flavour with our Dill-icious Dip Mix!

Serve with crackers, veggies or even pita chips! Such a fresh taste and who can’t resist a cream cheese dip….Everyone will enjoy it!

Ingredients:

  • 1 block of cream cheese
  • 1/2 cup mayonnaise
  • 1/2 cup plain greek yogurt or sour cream
  • 1/4 cup Feta cheese, crumbled
  • Dash of Salt – optional
  • Dash of Pepper – optional
  • 1 package of Splendor Garden Dill-icious Dip Mix

Instructions:

Soften and mash of cream cheese until all of the clumps are gone. Mix in your mayonnaise and greek yogurt so it’s evenly blended and smooth. Stir in the feta cheese. Add a little salt and pepper for flavour. Pour the entire package of the Dill-icious Dip Mix in to the cream cheese mixture and stir until evenly blended. For best results, store in the fridge for 2 to 4 hours before serving. Serve with veggies, crackers, pita chips or even pretzels.

Enjoy!